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    Fax: 928.634.8960
    info@SpectrumHealthcare-Group.org

beauty in the brokennessPINTHIS

He was only 4 years old and the ocean before him looked as big as the sky. It was his first visit to the seaside and he eyed the   water with a mixture of awe and excitement, flinching each time a wave crashed upon the shore–a very loud noise to little ears.

And the shells…oh, they were everywhere! Tiny treasures offered up by the waves and left for him to find upon the wet sand. So many different shapes and colors and sizes. His mother had suggested he collect his favorites, so with  plastic beach pail in hand, hey eagerly combed the beach, bending to pick up shell after shell; within minutes, his pail was full.

He ran over to show his mother his haul. She scattered the contents of the pail out onto the sand and began to sort through them with her little boy. She quickly realized, though, that what he had brought her was a pail of broken shells:  a scalloped shell missing a chunk from its delicate arch; half of a sand dollar; a sliver of abalone…

She had not given him the proper instructions for shell collecting, so she gently explained that most of the shells he had picked were broken. She told him the ocean is powerful and it will break most of the shells, so he should avoid those and pick, instead, the whole shells.

Her advice left his little face scrunched in confusion.

He looked up at her and then back down at the battered shells in his hands, their gentle swirls and colors glistening in the sun. These were the shells that had drawn his attention; these were the shells that had caught his eye.

“But mama,” he said, “the broken ones are still beautiful.”

We all have pieces broken by the waves of Life. In some, the pieces show clearly; in others, they are hidden. But the cracks and the chips and the holes don’t change who we are or what we are. They simply serve to show we have ridden the waves and emerged triumphantly upon the shore.

“The broken ones are still beautiful.”

spectrum healthcare ©2015

 

 

 

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Environment of Care.

It’s not a term you hear a lot, unless, like us, your priority is providing healthcare to your community. Then, Environment of Care is a pretty big deal.

Environment of Care is exactly what it sounds like: it’s all the details, both tiny and huge, that blend together to create a warm, friendly, professional healthcare home. From the management of patients to employee training to emergency management to even the maintenance of our vehicles; it is a thousand moving pieces that must constantly be monitored for the highest quality performance to better serve the people who come to us for their healthcare needs.

And although we work together as a team to bring the best environment of care to our patients, our Quality Management Department, under the leadership of its director, Laura Robinson, works tirelessly to make your Spectrum experience the best it can be.

And…it’s not gone unnoticed.

Recently, Spectrum Healthcare was recognized as a “Leading Practice” in the Environment of Care by the Joint Commission, which means that Spectrum’s Environment of Care is now considered a model for other organizations nationwide.

And while it’s wonderful to be recognized within our industry, it’s not why we do what we do. Helping YOU feel better is the reason we are here.

environment of care

spectrum healthcare ©2015

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finding sleepWe don’t normally post updates at midnight, unless that update is about insomnia, in which case, it makes perfect sense.

According to the National Sleep Foundation, 48% of Americans report occasional insomnia, while 22 % experience insomnia almost every night. Now, a lack of sleep can affect concentration, resulting in drowsiness, crankiness and irritability, but it also can take a toll on your health, putting those who suffer from a lack of sleep at a much higher risk for diabetes, depression and hypertension.

But there are steps you can take to help you find sleep.

  • Try to stick to the same sleep routine: going to bed and waking up at the same time to help regulate your body’s internal clock.
  • Avoid heavy meals at night. That big bowl of pasta eaten before bedtime can cause discomfort which leads to sleeplessness.
  • Short power naps can often help get you through the day and leave you refreshed, but for those suffering from insomnia, even a short nap can interfere with falling asleep at bedtime.
  • Keep the light low. Bright light, even from an e-reader, can stimulate brain activity and discourage sleep.
  • If you find yourself lying in bed for more than 15 minutes unable to fall asleep, get up. Engage in a quiet activity, like reading or watching television. It’s important for your brain to associate bed with sleeping and not lying awake, watching the clock. But, keep it boring. The more stimulating the activity, the more likely you’ll be to stay wide awake.

If you find your insomnia persists, give us a call at 928-634-2236. We are here to help you feel better and together, we can help you find a good night’s sleep.

spectrum healthcare ©2015

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Tending a garden is a marvelous thing.

On the surface, it is no more than dirt and plants, but the minute your hands touch the warm earth, something changes…something wonderful. You immediately become a part of all that is growing. As you tend the plants and watch them bloom and then fruit, you find yourself growing with it, learning from it. As you reach to pull the weeds that inhibit growth, you claim a small victory; as each new seed takes root and pushes upward, defying gravity, you realize that growth, no matter how small, is always a Good Thing.

Our Spectrum gardens are by no means the biggest. They probably won’t win any gardening prizes, or make the cover of a magazine, but to many of our patients, tending to them is a therapy in and of itself: the warm sun on your back, the smell of good clean dirt on your hands, and plants that look to you to care for them and help them grow, all under an Arizona blue sky.

Nature is often the very best medicine.

web garden 1PINTHIS

spectrum healthcare ©2015

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vines

If you live in the Southwest, you are fully aware that our rain levels are below average for much of the state. And we aren’t alone. California is experiencing drought at historic levels. You’d think with such a lack of rain that nothing would grow.

But in Napa Valley, where vineyards are found on every hillside, the vines are healthy.

How can this be?

Well, when rain is abundant, the roots of grapevines grow 10 feet deep, but in dry or drought conditions, those roots grow even deeper in their search for water. Twice as deep, even. It turns out that dry years are actually good for the plant because it forces the vine to really dig deep, into the soil. And although the fruit it produces is a bit smaller than that of a wet year, it has much more flavor.

People are a lot like grapevines.

We all face adversity; dry periods in Life; happiness droughts. And when we do, we have a choice. We can throw our hands up in despair, declaring that it will “Never rain happiness again,” or we can dig deep to find joy. It’s not easy; just as that grapevine root has to work to get to a place of health, so do we. And sometimes, we can’t do it alone–we need help to get back to a place of perspective.

But when we overcome, we find that the droughts in Life only increase our strength and resolve; we find our roots go much deeper than we ever thought possible, and the fruits of our struggle are sweet enough to bottle.

spectrum healthcare ©2015

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