Pumpkin Your Way to Good Health

By October 27, 2015Health Tips

web pumpkin health

We pick them.

We carve them.

We even put their spiced flavor in our lattes.

Yes, America loves its pumpkins. And that’s a Very Good Thing, because pumpkins, besides being fun to carve and delicious to eat, are packed with nutritional benefits.

Take weight loss, for example. Pumpkins are a fiber rich food, and fiber slows the digestion which means you feel full longer and are less likely to snack between meals.  There is actually more fiber in one cup of pumpkin than in two slices of whole wheat bread. (Note: Pumpkin-shaped Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups and Pumpkin Spice Lattes, unfortunately, don’t count toward your weight loss goals. Not even a little bit. )

And fiber isn’t the only benefit.

Beta-Carotene gives pumpkins their beautiful orange color, and when digested, converts to Vitamin A, the essential vitamin for healthy eyes as it helps the retina absorb light. (Carrots also area rich in beta-carotene, and you’ve never seen a rabbit wearing glasses, so you know it works. Sorry. We had to throw that joke in there.)Vitamin A also helps the body fight infections and viruses, but it doesn’t do it alone. Pumpkin delivers almost 20% of the recommended daily allowance of Vitamin C, which is always a plus during cold season. Plus, Vitamins A and C act as antioxidants, which protect and shield your body against free radicals which could lead to diseases such as cancer.

So, whether you bake them into muffins, mix them into stew or simply cut and roast them all on their own, do your body good by giving it pumpkin.

(And if a stray Pumpkin-shaped Reese’s Peanut Butter Cup makes its way from your child’s trick or treat back into your belly, we won’t tell.)

spectrum healthcare ©2015