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No Letting Go: Sedona Film Festival

By | Awareness, Behavioral Health, Community | No Comments

From the Sedona Film Festival:

“The Sedona International Film Festival is proud to partner with the Mental Health Coalition Verde Valley to present the Northern Arizona premiere of the multiple award-winning film “No Letting Go” showing Thursday, May 5 at 4 and 7 p.m. at the Mary D. Fisher Theatre. (click HERE for ticket information)

The premiere is one of the kick-off events of Mental Health Month. 

“No Letting Go” will have a community conversation after both screenings with Rose Boerner, President of NAMI (National Association of Mental Illness, Sedona) and Lisa Moore, both with family members who have struggled with mental illness and who will share their personal stories about the challenges of a diagnosis and proper care for loved ones.

What would you do to save your child? Based on a true story and adapted from “Illness”, an award-winning short film, “No Letting Go” follows the journey of one family’s struggle to understand and cope with the erratic behavior and emotional instability of their son, Tim. The family’s world starts to unravel as they discover that their son’s increasing fragility is due to mental illness.

Tim’s painful, yet invisible, struggle to cope with everyday life takes its toll on his parents and the well-being of his brothers. Anger, resentment and conflict arise as Tim’s parents desperately search for answers. As his symptoms become more and more debilitating, his parents are faced with painfully difficult choices that will change their lives forever.

Tim’s family must play an integral role in finding the help he desperately needs, but will it be too late? Will love, strength and courage prevail to reveal the resiliency of the human spirit?

“No Letting Go” is a powerful film that gives a voice to millions of families who suffer alone and in silence. This poignant film honestly depicts the potentially devastating impacts of mental health disorders, which affect one in five children in the United States every year. The pervasive stigma surrounding mental illness prevents people from seeking the help they need. Sharing stories using the power of film is an important step towards opening and erasing stigma.

“This films shines the deserving, dramatic, breathtaking light on mental illness,” says actress and activist Kathy Najimy.

Janet Susin, president of the National Association of Mental Illness Queens/Nassau calls “No Letting Go” a “hopeful film that anyone can identify with who has had their life turned upside down by a personal tragedy and struggled to find answers.”

The Mental Health Coalition Verde Valley is participating in May’s National Mental Health Awareness Month with an extensive series of local programs to increase the awareness of and dialogue about mental illness. The theme for May is “Hope, Help and Healing”, a month of stories, opportunities, experiences, learning, performances and film. Each week during the month has a special focus including youth and families the first week, post-traumatic stress disorder and trauma the second week, suicide and depression the third week and creativity and the healing process the last week. Each week during the month, on Thursday, a relevant film will be shown at the Mary D. Fisher Theatre in partnership with the Sedona Film Festival.

The Very Unglamorous Life-Saving Screening: the Colonoscopy

By | Health Tips, Primary Care | No Comments

Excuses. They are SO easy to find, aren’t they? We can come up with an excuse for just about anything we don’t want to do, including getting a colonoscopy:

“I’m too busy.”
“Now is just not a good time.”
“I won’t like it.”
“I think it’s going to be difficult.”
“There are other things I’d rather be doing.”

But when the alternative is colon cancer, none of those excuses really seem to matter, do they? According to statistics, colon cancer is the third leading cause of cancer related deaths in the United States. That’s huge. But the good news is that colon cancer is one of the most preventable cancers if caught early, which is exactly why a colonoscopy is so important. Through a standard colonoscopy screening, doctors can locate polyps, pre-cancerous growths, and remove them before cancer develops. Studies show that these polyps are found in 25 percent of men and 15 percent of women, aged 50 and older. In fact, research by The New England Journal of Medicine found that removing polyps via a colonoscopy can reduce the death rate from colorectal cancer by 53%.

Now, we know that talking about colonoscopies is not glamorous or exciting, and many people tend to put them off because the procedure is viewed as, well, embarrassing. But thanks to today’s advancements in medicine, the procedure has never been easier: easy preparation and a very gentle procedure performed under light sedation. Many patients awake with no recollection of the procedure at all.

March is National Colorectal Cancer Awareness month, so get your behind in to see a physician for this most invaluable cancer screening tool. It could save your life.

Colon Cancer

spectrum healthcare ©2016

Fear is a Jerk

By | Motivation | No Comments

Fear is a jerk.

It is a double-dipped, dyed in the wool, dirty rotten, no good jerk. And what’s even worse is that it’s no ordinary jerk. Oh no… it’s a clever jerk, because it disguises itself. We don’t always recognize it, because it goes by many aliases:

Self-Doubt
Lack of Confidence
Self-Loathing
Insecurity

It adds nothing; gives nothing…all it does is take. It doesn’t better our lives in any way.
And you can’t run from it or hide from it, because it will find you. It’s persistent. It delights in hiding around every corner.  It will whisper its lies until your eyes well up with tears and your heart feels like lead.

I told you…it’s a jerk.

You can’t escape FEAR, but you can defeat. And you do that, by facing it.

You do that by grabbing that jerk by the collar and telling it:

I am good enough.
I know I will make a mistake.
Probably, lots of them
I will embarrass myself repeatedly as I attempt to better myself.
But that doesn’t mean I’m going to stop. You don’t get to decide that. 

My mistakes and embarrassments…those are MINE. I own them.
They don’t make me insecure; they make me human.
I will fall down many times
But I won’t allow a jerk like FEAR to keep me down
I refuse to be afraid.
So, go bother someone else.

fear is a jerk photo-17 copy

spectrum healthcare ©2015

The One Thing You Can Always Change

By | Motivation | No Comments

There’s an old joke that says, “Everybody complains about the weather but nobody does a thing about it.”

It’s meant to point out the obvious fact that there are many things in Life over which we have no control.

Zero. Zip. Nada.

We have no control over our height, or the color of our eyes.

We have no control over the time the sun rises or sets.

We have no control over traffic.

We have no control over the person who tries to sneak 15 items into the “10 items or less” line.

And, like the weather, complaining about these things is a waste of energy because we simply can’t change them.

But there is one thing about all these things that we CAN change…our attitude toward them.

Unlike the weather and the traffic and the person in the “express check-out,” we have control over our attitude. We can change it, make it better. We have that choice each and every day. No one can do it for us and no one can take a positive attitude away from us without our consent.

We control it.

So, take a deep breath when Life hands you a situation completely out of your hands. Don’t try to change IT…change YOU instead.

(And please, count those items BEFORE you get into the “10 items or less” line. Those of us behind you with only two items thank you.) 

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