Category

Awareness

No Letting Go: Sedona Film Festival

By | Awareness, Behavioral Health, Community | No Comments

From the Sedona Film Festival:

“The Sedona International Film Festival is proud to partner with the Mental Health Coalition Verde Valley to present the Northern Arizona premiere of the multiple award-winning film “No Letting Go” showing Thursday, May 5 at 4 and 7 p.m. at the Mary D. Fisher Theatre. (click HERE for ticket information)

The premiere is one of the kick-off events of Mental Health Month. 

“No Letting Go” will have a community conversation after both screenings with Rose Boerner, President of NAMI (National Association of Mental Illness, Sedona) and Lisa Moore, both with family members who have struggled with mental illness and who will share their personal stories about the challenges of a diagnosis and proper care for loved ones.

What would you do to save your child? Based on a true story and adapted from “Illness”, an award-winning short film, “No Letting Go” follows the journey of one family’s struggle to understand and cope with the erratic behavior and emotional instability of their son, Tim. The family’s world starts to unravel as they discover that their son’s increasing fragility is due to mental illness.

Tim’s painful, yet invisible, struggle to cope with everyday life takes its toll on his parents and the well-being of his brothers. Anger, resentment and conflict arise as Tim’s parents desperately search for answers. As his symptoms become more and more debilitating, his parents are faced with painfully difficult choices that will change their lives forever.

Tim’s family must play an integral role in finding the help he desperately needs, but will it be too late? Will love, strength and courage prevail to reveal the resiliency of the human spirit?

“No Letting Go” is a powerful film that gives a voice to millions of families who suffer alone and in silence. This poignant film honestly depicts the potentially devastating impacts of mental health disorders, which affect one in five children in the United States every year. The pervasive stigma surrounding mental illness prevents people from seeking the help they need. Sharing stories using the power of film is an important step towards opening and erasing stigma.

“This films shines the deserving, dramatic, breathtaking light on mental illness,” says actress and activist Kathy Najimy.

Janet Susin, president of the National Association of Mental Illness Queens/Nassau calls “No Letting Go” a “hopeful film that anyone can identify with who has had their life turned upside down by a personal tragedy and struggled to find answers.”

The Mental Health Coalition Verde Valley is participating in May’s National Mental Health Awareness Month with an extensive series of local programs to increase the awareness of and dialogue about mental illness. The theme for May is “Hope, Help and Healing”, a month of stories, opportunities, experiences, learning, performances and film. Each week during the month has a special focus including youth and families the first week, post-traumatic stress disorder and trauma the second week, suicide and depression the third week and creativity and the healing process the last week. Each week during the month, on Thursday, a relevant film will be shown at the Mary D. Fisher Theatre in partnership with the Sedona Film Festival.

World Stroke Day: October 29

By | Awareness, Primary Care, Uncategorized | No Comments

Would you know how to detect the signs of a stroke? Most people don’t, and yet strokes are the 5th highest cause of death in the United States. Your ability to spot a stroke and then take action means the difference between life and death. The American Heart/Stroke Association has created an easy to understand graphic and some catchy tunes to help you recognize and act should a stroke occur.

The good news is that 80% of all strokes are preventable by enacting easy changes to create a healthier lifestyle. So read, sing, learn and make a difference.
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SING TO END STROKE

 

spectrum healthcare ©2015

Spectrum Recognized at NARBHA’s Annual Event

By | Awareness, Behavioral Health, Community, Integrated Care, Mental Health | No Comments

It is always an honor to represent Spectrum Healthcare. And when the work we do is recognized by our peers, well, it is an honor, indeed.

Last night, Spectrum Healthcare was recognized at the Northern Arizona Regional Behavioral Health Authority (NARBHA) annual event and we were so proud to receive three top honors, both individually and as an organization.

A huge congratulations to Gina Mendez for receiving her 20 year Service Award. Tirelessly caring for the needs of the people in your community is no small thing and Gina had done so with kindness and compassion for 20 years.

Spectrum’s Work Adjustment Training Program (WAT) took home the Mickey Hawley award for excellence in the provision of behavioral health. The WAT program helps seriously mentally ill clients develop skills and way to increase productivity so that they may overcome employment barriers and find meaningful work within the community.

And last, but certainly not least, Spectrum’s former CEO, Robert Cartia, received NARBHA’s Lifetime Achievement Award. Robert has dedicated his life to bettering the lives of those around him and improved mental healthcare has been his mission. Robert began when Spectrum was simply the Verde Valley Guidance Clinic and was instrumental in the crossover to Spectrum’s Integrated Care services, adding Primary Care and Pediatrics to Mental Healthcare services so that ALL the needs of a patient could be met under one roof.

Congratulations not just to those who took home awards last night, but to ALL those who strive to make their community better by helping those in it FEEL better. spectrum healthcare arizona_0031spectrum healthcare arizona_0032spectrum healthcare arizona_0033spectrum healthcare ©2015

The Moon and Healthcare

By | Awareness, Behavioral Health, Mental Health | No Comments

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The moon was amazing last night: an eclipse giving way to a moon covered in a reddish cast. Science explains why this occurs: the light from all the planet’s sunrises and sunsets are cast upon the moon during the middle of the eclipse, which creates that incredible orange-red glow.

We know why this beautiful moon occurs, but thinking back to thousands, or even hundreds of years ago, one can see how this event would be startling to those gazing up at the night sky. Without an understanding of why this was happening, people throughout history were left to make up their own explanations and stories. 

Mental health is a lot like that gorgeous moon.

Years ago, we had very few concrete explanations of why the body acts as it does. And when behaviors were startling, well, mankind made up its own explanations.

Today, we understand the human body and its marvelous complexities. And as technology increases, we understand it even more. We have studied and analyzed and through our discoveries, we’ve come up with solutions to make Life better for those in need.

That’s what we do at Spectrum everyday.

Our goal is to help educate our patients; to work with them as partners; to find the best healthcare solutions for mind and body.
To remove the scary and unknown from healthcare and replace it with peace of mind.

Primary care to Pediatrics to Mental Health…we do it all under one roof to make it as easy as possible for everyone to feel better.

spectrum healthcare ©2015